Vascular Ultrasound Clinic

AVC uses state-of-the-art Doppler (Duplex) ultrasound for its vein procedures.
We have an onsite Doppler ultrasound at two of our locations which means you can often have your scan and see a phlebologist (vein specialist) on the same day.
Experienced vein surgeon Dr David Huber and his team of vein specialists use Doppler ultrasound, which is a non-invasive test to precisely map the blood flow through the blood vessels using high-frequency sound waves that bounce off your body’s circulating red blood cells.
A standard ultrasound can produce images of your veins and arteries but can’t show the speed or flow of blood like a Doppler ultrasound can.
The Duplex imaging system we use is an advanced form of ultrasound because it combines Doppler analysis and flow with B-Mode ultrasound imaging to provide a comprehensive analysis of the condition.
This is particularly useful when doctors are trying to detect and monitor blood clots or poorly functioning valves.
Ultrasounds involve no radiation and can help to identify blockages (stenosis), abnormalities like plaque or blood clots (DVT), narrowing of vessels and evaluating varicose veins.
Ultrasound can also be used to detect tumours and malformations and identify areas where there is reduced or greater than normal blood flow to specific areas.

Vascular Lab

What conditions do you scan for at AVCs Illawarra Vascular Ultrasound or South West Vascular Ultrasound?

AVC’s dedicated vascular technicians can scan for:
– All arterial disease (narrowing of abdominal, legs, neck vessels, kidney vessels, small bowel and large bowel.
– The only organ we do not perform ultrasound on is the heart, which is usually performed by a cardiologist.
– Scans for venous conditions for the general population pay a gap fee usually less than a $100.
– Scans for arterial conditions are bulk-billed for all patients.
– Pensioners are bulk-billed for both arterial and venous conditions.

Note: You do not need to see the vascular specialist first to have a vascular scan in our labs, which will save you a second consult fee.

What is the difference between a normal ultrasound, a Doppler and Duplex ultrasound?

Dr Huber and his team of specialists prefers Duplex ultrasound, which is a test to estimate the blood flow through the blood vessels using high-frequency sound waves that bounce off your body’s circulating red blood cells.
A standard ultrasound can produce images of your veins and arteries but can’t show the speed or flow of blood like a Doppler ultrasound can.
The Duplex imaging system we use is an advanced form of ultrasound because it combines Doppler analysis and flow with B-Mode ultrasound imaging to provide a comprehensive analysis of the condition.
This is particularly useful when doctors are trying to detect and monitor blood clots or poorly functioning valves.

What happens in a vascular ultrasound and how long does it take to complete?

– Most vascular ultrasounds take between half an hour to 45 minutes.
– Medications can be taken as per normal, and no fasting is required unless it is a belly or pelvic scan where fasting is required from midnight the night before. Fasting scans are generally performed in the morning and patients with diabetes contact us for fasting instructions.
– You just need to arrive 10-20 minutes before your scan time.
– During the procedure you will be asked to lie on a special table, and a non-toxic gel will be applied to the skin and a probe placed over the area to be examined.

What are the pros and cons of ultrasound for vascular conditions?

– Ultrasound involves no radiation, no anaesthesia and no needles, so is a low-risk procedure.
– Nor does it use contrast dye which can impair kidney function.
– Ultrasound is extremely useful in helping to identify blockages (stenosis), abnormalities like plaque or blood clots (DVT), narrowing of vessels and evaluating varicose veins.

Download an information sheet here